Ginger health series by Cruising Review to enhance and protect health before, while, and after traveling.


Unveiling the Health Secrets of Ginger: Optimal Forms for Maximum Benefits

Ginger, a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root, has been widely used for its culinary and medicinal properties. From ancient times to modern-day holistic health practices, ginger has been a cornerstone in treating various ailments and promoting overall wellness. This article delves into the science-backed benefits of ginger, the most effective forms for absorption, and its versatile use in tea and body lotion.

Scientifically-Proven Benefits of Ginger

• Digestive Health: Ginger is renowned for its ability to alleviate nausea and vomiting, especially related to pregnancy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Its compounds stimulate saliva, bile, and gastric enzymes, helping digestion and reducing the risk of gastrointestinal irritation.

• Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects: Ginger contains gingerol, a substance with potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. These can reduce oxidative stress, which is the result of having an excess of free radicals in the body, thus helping to prevent chronic diseases.

• Pain Reduction: Studies have shown that ginger is effective in reducing pain, particularly menstrual pain and pain related to osteoarthritis.

• Cardiovascular Health: Consuming ginger can lower cholesterol levels and blood sugar, reducing the risk factors for heart disease.

• Fighting Infections: Gingerol can help lower the risk of infections by inhibiting the growth of many different types of bacteria.

Enhancing Ginger Absorption

To reap the maximum health benefits, the form in which ginger is consumed matters:

• Fresh vs. Dried: Fresh ginger contains higher levels of gingerol. For those seeking the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits, fresh ginger is preferable.

• Supplements: Ginger supplements are an effective way to consume a concentrated dose. Look for supplements that are certified for purity and potency.

• Pairing with Fat: Similar to curcumin in turmeric, some of ginger's compounds are fat-soluble. Consuming it with fat can enhance absorption.

Ginger in Tea and Body Lotion

• Ginger Tea: A popular method to consume ginger is through tea. Ginger tea can be made by simmering slices of fresh ginger in water. This not only aids in digestion but can also be a soothing, warming drink. Adding honey and lemon not only enhances the flavor but can also add to the health benefits.

• Ginger Body Lotion: Ginger's anti-inflammatory properties make it a great ingredient for body lotions. It can help improve blood circulation and relieve tired muscles. Its antioxidant properties also protect the skin from aging and environmental damage.

Conclusion

Ginger offers a myriad of health benefits, from aiding digestion to fighting inflammation and infections. The form in which ginger is consumed can affect its benefits, with fresh ginger and supplements being among the most potent forms. Whether it's through sipping a comforting cup of ginger tea or nourishing your skin with a ginger-infused lotion, incorporating ginger into your daily routine can significantly contribute to your overall health and wellbeing.


Ginger

GINGER :Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), a well-known herbaceous plant, has been widely used as a flavoring agent and herbal medicine for centuries. Furthermore, the consumption of the ginger rhizome is a typical traditional remedy to relieve common health problems, including pain, nausea, and vomiting.

It is rich in various chemical constituents, including phenolic compounds, terpenes, polysaccharides, lipids, organic acids, and raw fibers. The health benefits of ginger are mainly attributed to its phenolic compounds, such as gingerols and shogaols.

Keywords: ginger, human health, randomized controlled trials, systematic review, Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, reactive oxygen species, dyspepsia, fatty liver, gastrointestinal cancer, gastrointestinal mucosa, gastroprotective, gingerol, irritable bowel syndrome, nausea, shogaol, swallowing, vomiting gastric emptying, Zerumbone, Zingiber, phytochemicals, antioxidant, antinausea, antiobesity, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, ginger extracts, chemoprevention, chemotherapy, natural compou

Summary of Abstracts:

Ginger on Human Health: A Comprehensive Systematic Review of 109 Randomized Controlled Trials [ Ginger has improvement of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, inflammation, metabolic syndromes, digestive function, and colorectal cancer’s markers were consistently supported. ] Clinical applications of ginger with an expectation of clinical benefits are receiving significant attention. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive discussion in terms of the clinical effects of ginger in all reported areas. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guideline, randomized controlled trials on the effects of ginger were investigated. Accordingly, 109 eligible papers were fully extracted in terms of study design, population characteristics, evaluation systems, adverse effects, and main outcomes. The reporting quality of the included studies was assessed based on the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing the risk of bias in randomized trials and integrated together with studies that investigated the same subjects. The included studies that examined the improvement of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, inflammation, metabolic syndromes, digestive function, and colorectal cancer’s markers were consistently supported, whereas other expected functions were relatively controversial.

Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginger in Health and Physical Activity: Review of Current Evidence [ The anticancer potential of ginger is well documented and its functional ingredients like gingerols, shogaol, and paradols are the valuable ingredients which can prevent various cancers. ] Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) belongs to the family Zingiberaceae. The health-promoting perspective of ginger is attributed to its rich phytochemistry. This study aimed to review the current evidence on ginger effects as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative.

Methods:

We searched MEDLINE for related publications using “ginger” and “anti-oxidative” and “ginger” and “anti-inflammatory” as keywords. This search had considered Papers that had been published between 2000 and 2010 without any filter.

Conclusions:

The anticancer potential of ginger is well documented and its functional ingredients like gingerols, shogaol, and paradols are the valuable ingredients which can prevent various cancers. This review concludes to favor ginger but some ambiguities necessitate further research before claiming its efficacy.

Ginger in gastrointestinal disorders: A systematic review of clinical trials Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, which is used as a spice globally has a long history of medicinal use that stimulates investigators to assess its potential roles as an adjuvant therapy or alternative medicine in a range of diseases. Anti‐inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumor, and antiulcer effects of ginger have been proven in many scientific studies, and some of the ancient applications of ginger as a home remedy has been confirmed in human. In this review, we summarized the current evidence on the effects of ginger consumption on gastrointestinal disorders based on clinical trials. Our data indicate that divided lower daily dosage of 1500 mg ginger is beneficial for nausea relief. Because of limited number of studies on some other gastrointestinal disorders, the results may not be as much powered as to find significant results. Therefore, more extensive and well‐controlled human studies of ginger or its standard extracts are required to demonstrate its efficacy as a gastroprotective agent. Dose‐finding studies should be undertaken to accurately determine the effective dose and preparation of ginger in further clinical trials protocol.

Bioactive Compounds and Bioactivities of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) [ It is rich in various chemical constituents, including phenolic compounds, terpenes, polysaccharides, lipids, organic acids, and raw fibers. The health benefits of ginger are mainly attributed to its phenolic compounds, such as gingerols and shogaols. ] Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is a common and widely used spice. It is rich in various chemical constituents, including phenolic compounds, terpenes, polysaccharides, lipids, organic acids, and raw fibers. The health benefits of ginger are mainly attributed to its phenolic compounds, such as gingerols and shogaols. Accumulated investigations have demonstrated that ginger possesses multiple biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer, neuroprotective, cardiovascular protective, respiratory protective, antiobesity, antidiabetic, antinausea, and antiemetic activities. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the bioactive compounds and bioactivities of ginger, and the mechanisms of action are also discussed. We hope that this updated review paper will attract more attention to ginger and its further applications, including its potential to be developed into functional foods or nutraceuticals for the prevention and management of chronic diseases.

Ginger [ Owing to its medicinal properties, ginger has gained considerable attention as a dietary supplement in the United States and Europe. To date, research studies have shown biological activities of ginger to include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiemetic, antiapoptotic, antihyperglycemic, and anticancer properties. Most recently, ginger was shown to improve wound healing in combination with curcumin, a member of the ginger family and another spice with powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities. CHEMOPREVENTIVE EFFECTS OF GINGER have been observed in cancers of the skin, breast, and colon. ] Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe, is best known for its role as a flavoring agent for food in Asian and Indian recipes. Since the 16th century, ginger has been used to treat various medical ailments and conditions, including migraines, arthritis, gingivitis, stroke, ulcers, constipation, diabetes, and nausea. It is even believed to help with symptoms of the common cold or influenza. In 1807, William Roscoe, an English botanist, named the ginger plant Zingiber after the Sanskrit word for horn-shaped. The ginger family of plants comprises more than 1,200 species in 53 different genera. Owing to its medicinal properties, ginger has gained considerable attention as a dietary supplement in the United States and Europe. To date, research studies have shown biological activities of ginger to include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiemetic, antiapoptotic, antihyperglycemic, and anticancer properties. Most recently, ginger was shown to improve wound healing in combination with curcumin, a member of the ginger family and another spice with powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities.

Ginger ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in the Prevention of Ageing and Degenerative Diseases: Review of Current Evidence [ ginger ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is one of the potential herbs that can be used to reduce the level of oxidative stress and inflammation ] Currently, the age of the population is increasing as a result of increased life expectancy. Ageing is defined as the progressive loss of physiological integrity, which can be characterized by functional impairment and high vulnerability to various types of diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and atherosclerosis. Numerous studies have reported that the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation contributes to the development of these diseases. In general, oxidative stress could induce proinflammatory cytokines and reduce cellular antioxidant capacity. Increased oxidative stress levels beyond the production of antioxidant agents cause oxidative damage to biological molecules, including DNA, protein, and carbohydrates, which affects normal cell signalling, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis and leads to disease pathogenesis. Since oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to these diseases, ginger ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is one of the potential herbs that can be used to reduce the level of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginger consists of two major active components, 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol, which are essential for preventing oxidative stress and inflammation. Thus, this paper will review the effects of ginger on ageing and degenerative diseases, including AD, PD, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, and osteoarthritis.

Investigation of the effect of ginger on the lipid levels: A double blind controlled clinical trial To study the effect of fine powder of ginger on lipid level in volunteer patients. This is a double blind controlled clinical trial study in 2 cardiac clinics Cardiac Disease Clinic, Babol, north of Iran, between April to May 2004. We randomly divided the patients with hyperlipidemia into 2 groups, treatment group (receiving ginger capsules 3 g/day in 3 divided doses) and placebo group (lactose capsule 3 g/day in 3 divided doses) for 45 days. All subjects with diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, and alcohol drinking, pregnancy and peptic ulcer were excluded. Lipid concentrations profile before and after treatment was measured by enzymatic assay. Forty-five patients in the treatment group and 40 patients in placebo group participated in this study. There was a significant reduce in triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), levels of before and after study separately in each group (p<0.05). Mean changes in triglyceride and cholesterol levels of ginger group were significantly higher than placebo group (p<0.05). Mean reduction in LDL level and increase in high density lipoprotein level of ginger group were higher than the placebo group, but in VLDL level of placebo was higher than ginger (p>0.05). The results show that ginger has a significant lipid lowering effect compared to placebo.

Topical Ginger Treatment With a Compress or Patch for Osteoarthritis Symptoms [ Topical ginger treatment has the potential to relieve symptoms, improve the overall health, and increase independence of people with chronic osteoarthritis. ] This article is a report of a study evaluating changes in health status before and after topical gin- ger treatment for adults with moderate to severe osteoarthritis. Method: In 2011, 20 adults with chronic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to one of two groups for 7 consecutive days of topical ginger treatment by trained nurses: Group 1 received a manually prepared ginger compress and Group 2 a standardized ginger patch. Participants had the option to continue self-treatment using the ginger patch for a further 24 weeks. A brief arthritis health questionnaire was completed weekly for 3 weeks and 4 weekly for 24 weeks. Results: The mean scores for Group 1 and Group 2 show a notable decline following 1-week topical ginger treatment; scores in pain, fatigue, global effect, and functional status reduced by 48%, 49%, 40%, and 31%, respectively, whereas health satisfaction improved from 80% dis- satisfied to 70% satisfied. Scores for all participants in all five domains progressively reduced over the following 24 weeks of self-treatment. Conclusion: Topical ginger treatment has the potential to relieve symptoms, improve the overall health, and increase independence of people with chronic osteoarthritis.

Ginger Extract (Zingiber Officinale) has Anti-Cancer and Anti-Inflammatory Effects on Ethionine-Induced Hepatoma Rats Ginger may act as an anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent by inactivating NFkappaB through the suppression of the pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha.

Mechanisms of Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Proprieties of Ginger Extracts in Cancer [ Ginger derivatives perpetrate its anti-tumor action through important mediators, involved in crucial cell processes, such as cell cycle arrest, induction of cancer cell death, misbalance of redox homeostasis, inhibition of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and dissemination of cancer cells. ] Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, family: Zingiberaceae), originating in South-East Asia, is one of the most used spices and condiments for foods and beverages. It is also used in traditional medicine for many human disorders including fever, gastrointestinal complications, arthritis, rheumatism, hypertension, and various infectious diseases due to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiemetic properties. Intriguingly, many recent studies evidenced the potent chemopreventive characteristics of ginger extracts against different types of cancer. The aim of this work is to review the literature related to the use of ginger extracts as a chemotherapeutic agent and to structure the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which ginger acts in different cancer types. Data summarized from experiments (in vitro or in vivo) and clinical studies, evidenced in this review, show that ginger derivatives perpetrate its anti-tumor action through important mediators, involved in crucial cell processes, such as cell cycle arrest, induction of cancer cell death, misbalance of redox homeostasis, inhibition of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and dissemination of cancer cells.


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